AMIT

“Those who choose differently must suffer the consequences. They must take the pain their decisions bring.”

Sachin Kundalkar, Cobalt Blue

The above quote is from the brilliant book that I had read years back – Cobalt Blue written by Sachin Kundalkar. It was originally written in Marathi which was then translated in English by Jerry Pinto.

The reason I am taking about this book because it was recently adapted for a movie by Netflix starring Prateik Babbar, Dr. Neelay Mehendale, Anjali Sivaraman, Neil Bhoopalam and Geetanjali Kulkarni amongst others.

The story is about a pair of brother-sister both whom fall in love with one man: their unnamed paying guest – A painter, a vagabond but most importantly someone whose loyalty lies only to himself. There is no betrayal but a genuine forged relationship that helps his lovers i.e. the brother and sister understand and face their inner truth and face their demons.

While watching this film I couldn’t help but go back to the character played by Prateik Babbar that of Amit in the 2008 rom-com Jaane Tu… Ya Jaane Na. Amit is a loner who always has a bone to pick with the boyfriend of his sister. He is an introvert with a quirky lifestyle having a mouse as a pet. Pratiek Babbar had received a special mention by the Filmfare Awards for acting in this film which was incidentally his debut performance too.

In the movie Cobalt Blue the unnamed paying guest is the sure-footed confident man with no family who moves from town to town on projects/visits. Prateik Babbar brilliantly essays both these roles seamlessly.

I strongly believe that if the character Amit from Jaane Tu… Ya Jaane Na had a story of its own then Cobalt Blue is perfect extension to that and helps us getting behind his motives and behavior.

I believe this is how the story of Amit goes …..

The reason he is a loner with a quirky lifestyle can be attributed to the fact he is still coming to terms with his sexuality. Over the next few years over numerous sexual interactions and failed relationships he finally comes to terms that he is someone who is attracted to both the genders and is a bisexual man. Having loved and lost he has a difficulty forging permanent relationships and always has an escape plan ready to move on, for fear of getting attached.

This very lifestyle takes him away from his immediate family, moving from one city to another monetizing his painting skills and doing customized job works. Hell bent on hiding his history and family behind a façade of fake narrative so as not to have a permanency and attachment to one place or person.

In Jaane Tu… Ya Jaane Na he wants nothing but the best for his sister and in Cobalt Blue he ensures that his lovers Tanay & Anuja are able to burn the bridges and move on to greater things in life. He helps them understand themselves thru him.

The story of Amit is something that is waiting to be remade as a series or a film. Amit is flawed character that is waiting to be heard and seen.

Padmaavat

654778-padmaavatDisclaimer : This is my review of the film and I am no historian to vouch for any historical accuracy / inaccuracy. If you are someone with heightened spirit of taking offence please don’t read any further.

Padmaavat the movie is based on an epic poem written in 1540 by Sufi poet Malik Muhammad Jayasi, so we are told in the beginning of the film to set the record straight by the filmmakers.

I am not getting into the plot of the film as we are all aware of the same thanks to the Karni Sena,  overactive media, our school textbooks and by the tourist guides at Chittorgarh Fort (though the version is very much sanitised now bowing to the popular demand).

But contrary to what Karni Sena had been saying all along the movie is actually an ode to the valour, principles and righteousness of the Rajputs, had they seen the movie they would have learnt a thing or two before throwing stones at school buses and burning commercial establishments. Thankfully for someone like me who rarely moves out of the comfort zone of the Kingdom of Mewar, Amazon Prime proved to be a boon for bringing this visual treat to the small screens of our bedrooms. So like all Sanjay Leela Bhansali productions goes this is a visual treat mounted on a scale that maybe only SLB can outdo in his next productions.

As far as the cast is concerned Shahid Kapoor as Raja Ratan Singh has nothing much to do but offer platitudes on the आन-बान-शान of Rajputs. To match up the cruel and despotic Allaudin Khilji played brilliantly by Ranveer Singh someone more worthy was needed. Ranveer Singh plays all that is required by the character: eccentric, अय्याश, despotic, winner at all cost and only thing that he doesn’t openly play is a bisexual, with not so subtle hints thrown by the antics of his slave boy Malik Kafur.

Then there is The Padmawati – Rani Sa herself: Deepika Padukone. She looks ethereal, slays it with her acting and her presence. What she needs is a standing ovation after the movie. For me the whole movie is encapsulated in the last dramatic Johar scene. This is the scene that makes one a fan of Mr. Bhansali’s movies atleast I can proudly say that about myself. I am a sucker for drama, extravaganza and subtle OTT (I know its an oxymoron but watch the entire SLB movies to know what I mean).

Frankly if not for the controversy I doubt this movie would have been such a colossal hit but I guess any publicity is always good for the film either bad or good. The first half is a little drag but when Rani Sa gets in action there is never a dull moment !!

So go watch the film on Amazon Prime, the subscription is just Rs. 999/- and if you are an Airtel user download the Airtel Movies app and get one year subscription absolutely free, like I did and saved atleast 3K on the subscription, the movie tickets, popcorn and coffee and instead relished the movie from the comfort of my Bed.